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, 40 of them in new york city. and while an army of federal, state, and local workers, and many volunteers, have joined the massive relief and recovery effort, 2-1/2 million remain without power, four days after losing it monday evening. tens of thousands are displaced. their homes broken or destroyed. 5500 remain in new york city shelters. gaslines stretch for hours and tempers flair. and as life returns to normal for many millions, from north carolina to maine, with folks living in the most severely area, on the new jersey shore, or the new york city burrows of brooklyn, queens and stat ten island, it's doubtful the scars will ever fully heal. the shocking loss of life in and around the nation's largest and commercially most important city. the epic extent and depth of the damage. and the struggle to find essentials like food, water, power, shelter, continue to preoccupy and stress out millions who thought that katrina could never happen here. but it has happened. and as they pump the tunnels and open the subways, iconic landmarks are twisted and broken, and still we find bodi
is returning to normal in new york city. all three airports are open as of today as is the new york stock exchange and broadway shows. problems still persist. traffic in the city is nothing short of a nightmare without public transportation wednesday manhattan streets were clogged with people trying to get back to work. there's some good news. subway and train service is starting up again today at least on a limited basis. >> i am declaring a transportation emergency. >> reporter: mayor bloomberg is mandating that all cars driving into manhattan has to have at least three people. >> i know it is inconvenient for a lot of people but the streets can only handle so much. >> reporter: half of all gas stations in the area are closed. the result, long lines. >> hundreds of cars here trying to get gas. >> reporter: analysts say it could get another week to get all the gas stations back up and running. lack of power continues to be a problem in this area of manhattan. officials say, though, that people in manhattan may see the lights go back on as early as tomorrow or saturday. in other parts of
are broadcasting from new york city and st. louis, missouri. the death toll of superstorm sandy along the eastern seaboard has jumped to 98 as more bodies are recovered by the dead. 40 people have been killed in new york city, half of them on staten island, which was overcome with devastating flooding. staten island residents have criticized local and federal officials for allegedly ignoring recovery there, saying they're in desperate need of aid. new york city is facing criticism for continuing with its famed annual marathon nday, , spite calls for postponement. supporters of a delay have argued the marathon will divert attention and resources from aiding the hundreds of thousands who still lacked power and are in need of relief. utility officials have predicted that electricity will be mostly restored to lower manhattan by the weekend. though several million from long island to new jersey could be in the dark for a least another week, some 1.6 million people remain without power in new jersey. it is e state hardest hit by the storm. new jersey officials have disclosed some 336,000 gallons of di
slamming new york city. >> few more days and no power new york might get weird. >> on cbs "this morning." >> speaking foreign language >> when your city is flooding that's as bad as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. >>> welcome to cbs "this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york, norah o'donnell is in washington. the extent of superstorm sandy's damage has become clearer and more alarming, five a day. this morning sandy is blamed for 75 deaths in ten states. and about 5 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city many subway and commuter trains are now running and the city has put restrictions on drivers trying to get into manhattan. drivers also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. this morning hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore are facing months even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in things where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself on wednesday. jeff, good morning. >> reporter: norah, good morning to you. 14 are dead in new jersey but there is increasing concern that as more homes are searched
mister. >> and all that matters. >> amazing time-lapsed video of sandy slamming new york city, the water rushing in, power going out. >> new york might get weird with a few more days without power. [ speaking spanish ] >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. as you wake up in the west, the extent of superstorm sandy's damage is becoming cloe ining c more alarming. blamed for 75 deaths in 10 states and 4.6 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city, many subway and xhouter trains are now running. drivers are seeing huge traffic jams going into manhattan. they also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore this morning are facing months, even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in atlantic city, where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself. jeff, good
. now lying in piles of rubble that stretch for miles across the new york city borough of staten island. cleanup is underway. and with every new layer of debris that's removed, the tragic stories emerge of the residents whose lives have been turned upside down. cnn's brian todd is on the scene for us. brian, what are you seeing on staten island right now? >> reporter: well, wolf, at just about every house you go to in the section of staten island you hear horrific and pretty detailed stories of just how bad the storm was. here's the story of one man who took a few hits. if you can't imagine what it's like to suffer through a massive storm, listen to nick. >> the water was so high. it was up to this part of the door. i couldn't get into the door. i went around the side of the house. and i stood on a box that was floating. and i went through the window to get back in the house with my family. >> reporter: taking us through his house on staten island, the retired ups truck driver says he and his family scrambledto n upper floor away from water he was sure was going to keep rising. his wife
island, new york. >>> new york city is opening schools today for the first time. >>> tuesday is election day so generators are being brought in and polling locations are being moved so ravaged sections of new york and new jersey residents will be able to vote. it remains unclear if the preparations are enough to avoid depressed turnout in communities which still lack power or people have been forced to leave their homes. >>> new york city's transit system remains a problem in the days after superstorm sandy. yesterday governor cuomo suspended tolls in the rockaways. the loss of train service makes it especially hard for residents to get back and forth. the suspended tolls will remain in place. >>> today and tomorrow fairfax police testimony is going to collect food and clothing for the victims of superstorm sandy. >> matt jablow has more. >> reporter: captain laura kenyan is the head of the criminal investigation division of the city of fairfax. >> my co-workers rally. >> reporter: during more than 20 years as a police officer she has witnessed all types of tragedies. >> but none apparen
" steve moore is here with all of the facts. >>> thanks but no thanks. new york city mayor bloomberg tls president obama, not to visit the big apple after the storm. i say thank goodness. but one of my guests says bloomberg is way out of bounds. he is here to disagree with me. even when they say it's not, it is always about money. melissa: first after a two-day hiatus, let's look at market headlines. wall street swung back into gear on the first day of trading since superstorm sandy. stocks were choppy throughout the session. they closed mixed throughout the day. dow closed down 10 points. home depot closed higher on the dow. expected demand of home and construction suppli sent shares up 2%. that makes sense. facebook shares tumbled 4%. a lockup expired on 229 million shares today. another 804 million shares will become unlocked on november 14th. >>> lots of damage to assess. the president just spoke after touring new jersey with governor chris christie today. while super storm sandy continues on its path of destruction the area northeast of pittsburgh is the latest to get hit. leaving c
that passport renewed in time for your trip. >> new york city is all but shut down. >> reporter: how about the next big storm? >> the weather guys will have to look out the window more often. >> reporter: meterologists were able to track hurricane sandy using federal satellites. will noaa be able to spend what it needs? >> satellite controlled navigation, that system won't be put in place. >> reporter: we could see slowdowns at some airports. >> the faa is going to have to take some controllers out of the towers. >> reporter: fuller says everybody will be inconvenienced but worse? >> just about everybody will see their tax goes up. >> reporter: people who work will see their payroll tax goes up and people who itemize won't be able to deduct child care expenses because congress hasn't continued those reductions and small businesses will lose money because of changes in the inheritance tax. >> we lose most of the jobs that have been added and we're back to the depths of the recession again. >> reporter: peggy fox, 9 news now. >> nobody wants to go back there. now the governor of virgini
. >>> on to superstorm sandy where new york city has now canceled the marathon. that's one of the biggest sporting events of the year but at least 41 new yorkers died in the super symptoms, and nearly half of them on statten island. hundreds need food and water, and they say help just isn't coming fast enough. >> reporter: the new york city marathon is the latest victim of superstorm sandy. the city canceled after public backlash. some complained the marathon would take police away from areas still recovering from the storm. the mayor issued a statement saying we cannot allow controversy over an athletic event to distract attention away from the critically important work that is being done to recover from the storm. many of those affect agreed. >> life changes. you can't -- sometimes you've got to cancel things. there was no halloween. >> reporter: sandy's force is very visible on steapt island where the marathon was supposed to start. in gray kills harbor, boats are piled on top of each other. homes are boarded up, some with signs begging for help. >> we've been completely devastated. >> reporter: hundr
storm victims. new york city mayor michael bloomberg is comparing the storm's impact to hurricane katrina. he says as many as 40,000 people were left homeless by the storm though that number is worst case scenario. public schools in new york and new jersey are hoping to return students to some sense of normalcy. some cools will reopen today and others possibly by wednesday. people are still waiting in line for hours to get gas. the defense department has set up stations in the new york city areaway 10-gallon limit. -- some schools will reopen today. >>> some breaking news from the sandy storm zone. a small earthquake has struck in northern new jersey. the u.s. geological survey says the 2.0 uake hit at 1:19 this morning in ridgewood, new jersey. some residents reported hearing a lot boom when the quake struck but for reports of damage this morning. >>> coming up next, changes are coming to d.c.'s speed camera fines. >> the mayor makes a move to lower what drivers will pay but the battle to make them even lower is not over just yet. fox 5 morning news is back in a moment. 
. >>> still to come in this half- hour, a late breaking development about the new york city marathon after anger in all five boroughs. top. >> well, a little chilly today. high temperatures held in the low 50s. let me show you temperatures right now. temperatures are in the 40s to around 50. 47, or 49 as you get out to the college park area, 47 in gaithersburg. we'll come back and tell you what the windchills are and look ahead to the rest of the weekend. >>> but first, one of the worst bridges in our area is getting some attention, and it could put a detour in your weekend travel plans. we'll have that after the break. >>> a commuter alert about major work on one of our worst brimin the area. the bridge carrying washington boulevard has been rated poor in the past so now work is getting going to improve the inter change. that means this weekend columbia pike will be closed between south quinn street and south orem. if you need to be in that area find an alternative way to get around. in bethesda part of rockville pike will be closed between 7:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. tomorrow. one northbound
. welcome, everybody. our "starting point" this morning, the aftermath of the superstorm. new york city slowly getting back to normal this morning, but no heat, no power, gas running low. bumper to bumper traffic. patience is being tested. some subways are running again this morning, so many are buses. fares, free, today, as workers are trying to keep the financial heart of the country beating. rob marciano this morning at the brooklyn bridge for us. hey, rob, good morning! >> reporter: good morning, soledad. there'll be a lot of foot traffic once again over this bridge. and if you are in a car, you'll need at least three people in that vehicle. carpooling is going to be the call today, because yesterday, there was absolute gridlock across the city. we didn't have much in the way of bus lines running. these subways were still shut down. all the people that would typically travel underground were trying to get to work aboveground. and boy, some places, there was chaos. i mean, people pushing and shoving, just to try to get on a bus. many buses that were traveling past 10th and 14th stree
portion of new york city is still in the dark as crews rush to try to restore electricity. >> now little by little the city's transportation system is coming back online. limited subway, bus and commuter rail service is going to have start this morning. and ines ferre has more. >> reporter: president obama visited new jersey to sheafiest hand the damage from superstorm sandy -- see firsthand the damage from superstorm sandy. the president and governor chris christie flew in marine one to see the devastation from above. what they say were homes destroyed and streets still underwater. president obama promised the government will do whatever it can to help storm victims. >> we will follow-up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until you've rebuilt. >> reporter: not far away, the search for trapped or missing people on staten island continues. nypd rescued six people from rooftops on wednesday. there are signs that life is returning to normal in new york city. all three airports are open as of today. as is the new york stock exchange and broadway shows. but problems still pe
in mantiloking where homes were destroyed. new york city will try to return to normal this weekend. the mayor says the marathon will go on, but some people say that it should not because of the strained and already limited city resources. >> a lot of the damage is in staten island, where the race begins. >> under the workers with dominion virginia power and the american red cross are packing up and are prepared to head out of state. they will provide relief in some areas hit hardest by hurricane sandy. john gonzalez is an national harbor where they are staging to leave in a couple hours. >> its been a long week for virginia dominion. they restore power to more than 300,000 homes in northern virginia. pretty much everyone is back up and running, but the work continues for the company. this is a mobile operation this morning. 1500 workers are being sent out this morning to new jersey, where major outages remain. we are told this is the largest group ever sent out of state. these men and women are coming off very long days, as you can imagine. along the jersey shore, 50% of the homes are still w
filled with fury, michael bloomberg gave into the criticism and canceled the ing new york city marathon scheduled for this sunday. let's go live to cnbc's brian shactman with the latest. good evening, brian. >> reporter: hi, larry. as late as midafternoon mayor bloomberg was adamant that the race would go on. preparations were moving forward from the equipment to people signing up. but basically the negative momentum swung actually early this morning with the publication of a front-page article in the "new york post" about the huge generators that were being used to power the new york city marathon in central park. there was actually a third generator sitting idle. all three of those could have been used for recovery efforts. well, it exploded on twitter and facebook and eventually public figures came and spoke out against this. this afternoon, later in the day there were meetings and major bloomberg, canceled, didn't postpone but canceled the marathon. here are some of the statements from the mayor's office. while holding the race would not require diverting resources from the recovery
are mostly running again. the same cannot be said, though, for the new york city marathon, the largest in the world canceled at the last minute due to controversy. some runners, however, are making good use of this day. and abc's john schriffen has more on that. >> reporter: good morning, dan. instead of thousands of runners making their way to the starting line in staten island, later today, many will be coming right here to staten island ferry to gather donations. there's a lot going on here in downtown manhattan. right undermy feet, 5,000 gallons of water being pumped out of a subway station every minute to get it back up and running. we have signs of normalcy popping up, but there's still a lot of work to be done. flying high above the tristate, abc news got an exclusive close look at the coast guard cleanup efforts. the canal that separates new jersey from staten island where 350,000 gallons of fuel spilled over as a result of the superstorm. >> i think we're starting to win as far as the response. >> reporter: and this morning, a welcome sight, the crane that dangled so precariou
at the temperatures. charleston, west virginia, is in cold, but everybody else in the 30s. new york city, 39. the outskirts outside of the city even colder, closer to freezing. the windchills this morning are right there with you. i would love to tell you that it's getting warmer, but as people getting power back, stay in the 30s not only for nyc but atlantic city. false to freezing by early tuesday. we have to talk about this storm, of course, you got that jet stream holding on to that cold air. it's going to grab some moisture down in the southeast and that's where it picks up the pace and it starts to form the nor'easter. rain showers from the carolinas tuesday down into florida. for wednesday, it starts to move north. that's when the winds pick up in the northeast. 50-mile-an-hour winds. and then by thursday, it really mixing with some cold air. coastal new england gets the rain. back here in upstate new york. poconos getting into some of the snow. so, how much and what to expect? here it is, one to three inches of rain. six to 12-foot waves. and, of course, that inland snow. we'll have
>> from new york city, this is democracy now! >> there are people in areas without power. what about generators for them? you are making billionaires'. donate. >> as new york mayor michael bloomberg cancels the new york marathon under enormous city, we report on three of the hardest hit areas of new york and patent by superstorm sandy. statins island, the rockaway, and red hook. power returns to most of manhattan, but for most in the outer residents, many are still in the dark. >> it has been very hectic, especially for the little ones. it is kind of crazy. we need help. >> as the temperature at night drops near freezing, frustration is growing as residents complain about lack of food, power, and warm clothes. and we will look at how occupy wall street has transformed into occupied sandy relief. and could republican voter suppression swing the state of ohio for mitt romney? we will speak to our lieberman. >> it is not about stopping voter fraud but about republicans try to shape an electorate in their own favor, to make it harder for minority and low-income voters to vote in th
controversy. >>> gas rationing in new york city and long island nearly two weeks after superstorm sandy. after this week's nor'easter frustrations growing for thousands of sandy's victims. mark strassmann is in oceanport, new jersey. mark, good morning. >> good morning, charlie. behind me you see one of fema's two tent cities in new jersey. this one is the new home for 750 emergency workers and 60 storm victims. there are also hundreds of thousands of people waking up in their own cold homes this morning, 11 days after sandy hit this shore line. in wintry somerset county northern new jersey, utility crews are still days away from restoring everyone's power. wednesday's nor'easter with his a setback across the disaster zone. adela bolet just had gotten her electricity back on monday. >> such a relief like returning to civilization. >> reporter: that relief didn't last long. >> and then all of a sudden poof. and there we are, back in the middle ages. >> reporter: governor andrew cuoma blasted lipa utility company that services long island. >> part of it is just the
it the second most expensive storm in u.s. history, after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's death from superstorm sandy happened on staten island. homeland secretary janet napolitano is going there today, where people say they're suffering and not getting enough help. anna werner, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you stand on this street in staten island you can clearly see the path of destruction wrought by hurricane sandy. cars picked up and tossed like toys. that continues throughout the neighborho neighborhood. many residents say they feel ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten burrough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we're going to die! we're going to freeze! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours in to other parts of new york and new jersey. >> they don't talk about them that much. a lot of people here are hurting much it's upsetting. >> reporter: power is out. hundreds
to at least 60,000 homes and businesses in the new york city area. many of them had just got entheir power restored. >> the winter storm brought rain, strong winds and several inches of snow region. airlines cancelled nearly 1600 flights and highways and train routes were also disrupted and families shivered in homes. ben, how is everybody doing? >> reporter: well, norah you can see this is the last thing that people needed. the streets in tuckerton flood again, front yards flood. as nor'easters go this wouldn't be a big deal. but for a couple of days people were able to come back to this neighborhood to save what they could, tearing out carpets, ripping down walls. that has now been put on hold. one woman said this second storm feels like a second punch to the gut. when the nor'easter slammed into the jersey shore wind and rain quickly turned into a whiteout as temperatures plummeted into the low 30s. volunteers handed out blankets for those with no heat. >> just won't end now. unfortunate want it to be over. >> reporter: in snow covered belmar a generate oris running nick's one light and
. there were long lines to get gas and long lines to get into new york city, as police enforced a three-person per vehicle rule. traffic will only get better when all of the tunnels and subway lines are clear of water. and the pumps are operating 24 hours a day to speed up the process. but one look at this tunnel connecting manhattan and brooklyn shows just how much work is still left to be done. the nights are especially hard for people without electricity. >> we've been cold some nights. >> dark and cold. >> reporter: con ed says it will have power back on tomorrow for hundreds of thousands of people in manhattan. that's good news for elaine and mark. they have been stuck in their 20th floor apartment without elevator service since the storm knocked out power. >> coming up is really a hardship for us. >> that's why we stayed up here. >> reporter: here in new jersey, police began allowing people who live along the coast back into their homes for the first time since the storm. for many, it was an emotional homecoming. >> got upset. we lost everything we had. it's nothing we can do. >>
and businesses in the new york city region many of them had just gotten their power restored. >> the winter storm brought rain, strong winds and several inches of snow to the region. airlines canceled nearly 1,600 flights. highways and train routes were also disrupted and families shivered in homes across the northeast as temperatures fell below freezing. ben tracy is in hard-hit tuckerton, new jersey, along the jersey shore. how are they doing there? >> reporter: charlie and norah, good morning. good morning to our viewers in the west. folks here not doing so well this morning. streets are flood eded here in tuckerton. front yards are flooded. while this nor'easter on its own may not have been that big of a deal, here is the problem. for a couple of days people have been able to come back to neighborhoods like this, to begin the recovery rip out carpets and walls and stay ahead of the mold that is growing in some of these areas. that's all been put on hold. that one woman who told us that the second storm feels like a second punch to the gut. when the nor'easter slammed
york city, new jersey, and long island are up and running. for those who do get gas, they'll pay more for it. gasoline prices in the northeast have increased as much as 14 cents a gallon. >> tom: 1.3 million people are still without power tonight, one week after superstorm sandy. and as susie mentioned, temperatures are plummeting, as another storm approaches the northeast. having no power and no heat is one concern. but thousands of people have also been left homeless by the storm, and that is fueling worries about a housing shortage. erika miller reports. >> reporter: the new york city metropolitan area is slowly recovering after superstorm sandy. but many homes and businesses still don't have power, or heat. >> things that took months or ars bui are gone, how quickly we can get it back i'm not sure, but there will certainly be places that don't have power for a very long time. >> reporter: lack of power is more than just an inconvenience, it's also safety issue. temperatures have started hitting the low 30's, and a nor'easter is forecast later this week. so staying in unheated hom
system. not everybody is happy about mayor bloomberg's decision to green light the annual new york city marathon. that's happening this weekend. many new yorkers, they believe the city should focus its energy and its resources on recovery and cleanup, while others agree with the mayor that the city has to go on, and the race is going to be good for business. the storm knocked out power in heavily damaged buildings in each of new york's five burroughs. the race is set for sunday. local politicians, even some runners, they are calling on the mayor to postpone this marathon. we are actually waiting to hear from the mayor, mayor bloomberg, in a minute now. he is going to be having a press conference, giving an update on everything that's taking place in his city, recovery efforts. we are going to bring that to you live. you're seeing live pictures there. he will go to the podium and answer questions and provide as much information as possible about where the city stands now. >>> it is the final countdown in the battleground states that could decide the next president. we'll hear from presid
to the supply crunch. steven schork from the schork report is here with all the answers. >>> new york city is just beginning to recover from the storm but some businesses refused to their doors are making a killing. that is so new york. i will talk to one restaurant owner who hasn't stopped serving three meals a day to many more people he could have ever expected. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's take a look at the day's market headlines the bulls coming out strong to kick off november. a series of strong economic reports today helped boost investor optimism. the dow posted its biggest gain since september 13th, closing up 136 points. >>> building supplier masco was one of the biggest winners on the day. its shares rallied nearly 7% fueled by an expected spike in construction demand after superstorm sandy. >>> in after-hours action shares of linkedin are leaping. the professional social network beat third quarter earnings estimates on top and bottom line. linkedin upped full-year revenue guidance. >> one thing we truly need, we need more fuel. so we
are still without electricity and the death toll is 106. schools will reopen this morning in new york city and many other communities however drivers are still waiting in those long lines for gasoline and officials predict another difficult commute because not all subways and trains are running yet. >> there's new urgency in the recovery effort because the weather is not helping. millions of storm victims, jim axelrod is in the hard hit secretary of rockaway, queens. >> reporter: this week the weather forecast is throwing one more challenge at those devastated parts of new york and new jersey. freezing temperatures for 1.5 million customers in two states who are still without power. >> onions, garlic. >> reporter: in the far rockaway section of queens, volunteers aren't waiting for the government to help those who need it, they are doing it themselves. >> people need help. we just thought we would come out and give them some hot food. >> reporter: at this intersection a makeshift supermarket sprang up in a marking lot. donations from churches and synagogues provided the inventory. food, cl
this morning in new york city and many other communities. however, drivers are still waiting in those long lines for gasoline. and officials predict another difficult commute this morning because not all subways and trains are running yet. >> there is new you are jens in the recovery effort this morning because the weather is not helping millions of storm victims. jim axelrod is in the hard hit rockaways section of queens. >> reporter: good morning. this week, the weather forecasts are providing one more challenge for those parts of new york and new jersey that have been devastated by sandy. freezing temperatures that will affect the nearly 1.5 million customers still without power. >> onions. >> reporter: in the far rockaways section of queens, volunteers like diane chang aren't waiting for the government to help those who need it. they're doing it themselves. >> we're told they needed hot food out here. we thought we'd cook some hot food. >> reporter: at this intersection a makeshift supermarket sprang up in a parking lot. donations from churches and synagogues provided the inventory. fo
and we've already seen how bad that can be in new york city. we'll have more on that destruction there especially in the breezy point neighborhood coming up at 6:30. >> we were talking -- you can't even get trailers for people to stay in as temporary housing because there's no infrastructure and you've got to clear away all of that debris. >> reporter: yeah and in lower manhattan most of the roads are still completely flooded with water. they have to pump it all out. it's crazy. you can really understand why sandy is now being called new jersey and new york's katrina. >> it's big deal. >> thanks christine. >>> here's a look at the latest outage numbers in our area -- >>> this morning, police continue to investigate a fatal pedestrian accident in jermantown. sky 9 was over the scene yesterday when a 15-year-old was killed on jermantown road at wisteria drive. the victim has been identified as christina morris-ward. she was a tenth grader at seneca valley high school and he was walking to -- she was walking to school. julie wolf excuse me is live on the scene in jermantown and she
to fill up for home generators. as many as half of all gas stations in and around new york city are shut down because they are either out of fuel or don't have electricity with those lucky enough to have fuel, even more waiting as commuters spent hours in traffic jams waiting to get into new york city in many cases were hours long with new york city transit systems partially running. they wrapped around the block several times, forcing the buses to come into manhattan. lots of people coming in on foot. that was the way to go. lori: i heard old fallen trees. i melissa: it was fun. lori: so far, so good. at least in the city. melissa: all right, speaking of gas lines, let's take a look at trading on the cme. after unexpected drop last week fox business contributor in the pits of the cme. if sandy is still part of the equation? >> you bet it is. here and across the country. obviously got a nice boost for u.s. supplies because of course he really trying to rebound from the loss of supplies but if you look between the prin brent cru, they cannot send their oil. you have a lot of these tankers
rationing started this morning in new york city and on long island nearly two weeks after superstorm sandy after this week's nor'easter frustrations growing for thousands of sandy's victims. mark strassman is in oceanport, new jersey. mark, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. behind me is one of fema's two tent cities in new jersey, 750 emergency workers and about 60 storm victims. but there are hundreds of thousands of people waking up in their own cold homes this morning 11 days after sandy hit this coastline. in wintry somerset county, northern new jersey, utility crews are days away from restoring everyone's power. wednesday's nor'easter was a setback across the disaster zone. adela bolet just got her electricity back on monday. >> it was a relief. >> reporter: but that relief didn't last long. >> all of a sudden poof. and there we are back in the middle ages. >> reporter: in new york andrew cuomo blasted the power company that serves long island complaining it mismanaged the crisis. >> part of it is just the management and the performance, which has been unacceptable and they fai
. ♪ guts. glory. ram. >>> a lot of runners who travel to new york city to run in that new york city marathon this morning, instead headed to staten island and other areas hit hard by that superstorm sandy. they delivered relief supplies and helped victims clean out their flooded homes and though the storm's that struck -- intent on running the race they had trained for months to finish. they participated in unofficial alternative marathon that was organized on facebook. >>> celebrity chef and cookbook author was born in queens and his culinary career has included stops across new york city. so when superstorm sandy left millions without a decent meal, despirito did what he does best. he cooked up some soup and headed to the worst hit neighborhoods and started passing it out. rocko you have made your rounds, queens, manhattan, borooklyn, ad now staten island. what's it like to hand out so many meals to so many in need? >> it's wonderful to have a skill that's actually useful in a storm situation like this. i cook and people are hungry, it's a perfect match. >> how do you even go abou
beach after superstorm sandy hit. about 145,000 customers in new york city still do not have power as of today, but that number is going dosays public transit is coming back but people have to allow extra time for travel this week. many schools will be back in session tomorrow, even though some classrooms still do not have heat. here's a look at how the salvation army is helping out those hardest hit by sandy. >> reporter: the salvation army says planning for the response to superstorm sandy started days before the wicked weather hit land. >> specifically, we had our disaster relief coordinator for the bay area deployed. >> reporter: spokesperson laney says that coordinator is currently in new jersey, districting food, water and providing shelter for those in need. >> it's providing care, providing a listening ear to those that maybe have lost their homes and can't find a family member. we provide someone to talk to and a listening ear, shoulder to cry on. >> reporter: on a daily basis, more than 100,000 people are receiving their meals from more than a dozen of these cantines, foo
brand of pain. starting tomorrow drivers in new york city with license plate numbers ending in odd numbers can get gas. on saturday, folks with even numbers. right now only 25% of the gas stations are open. >> our own reporter bruce leshan knows what it's like to have to start over apartment tree crashed down on his home during superstorm sandy forcing him and his family out. >> reporter: i'm learning a lot about how to come back after a huge tree nearly destroyed my home. i'm hope wag i've learned is going to help other people. a week ago i lived in a forest of poplars. but all around the neighborhood now the chain saws are buzzing, the cranes are lifting the logs out of people's back yards. my neighbors are all scared that what happened to me might happen to them. and so they're taking out this tree now. later in the afternoon, this one will come down. luckily my wife had decided to ride out the storm down in the basement, because this was my bedroom. this crisis has convinced me that my friends and neighbors are the best ever. they helped me move into this house just a few block
sandy continues. tonight mary -- mayor bloomberg has canceled the new york city marathon but food, fuel and power are still out in the hardest-hit areas. >> four days later, the theory of sandy is too much -- the fuyr ry of sandy is too much to bear. >> we need help here. we truly do. we need someone to come and tell us which way to go. >> many simply are not going anywhere. >> lines have been 2 miles long. >> lines for fuel and traffic are just too charging phone have been overwhelming for many. >> in some cases, pushing patients and the motion over the edge. the difficulties stretch for miles along the atlantic coast. >> no heat, no power. >> hope is quickly fading. >> we have bodies removed -- being removed. >> devastation that after days of controversy forced organizers to cancel this weekend's new york city marathon. >> the race had become a distraction for people who were working trying to help people. >> how is beginning to show up by the truck load here. the basic necessities like water, food and warm clothes. tonight an all-star lineup of entertainers gathered for a benefit for
. >> bill, apparently the show must go on. new york city marathon will still go on despite all the devastation and suffering still happening around new york. a key city official is now breaking ranks from mayor bloomberg and calling for the race to be canceled. he'll join us next. >>> also, don't miss nbc's sandy benefit concert featuring spring seen, bon jovi, christina aguilera among many others. all proceeds will be donated to the american red cross relief earths. that's tonight. you'll find it here tonight on cnbc. in fact, all of the nbc kmachans will carry it beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern time. stay tuned. aspirin, really? i haven't thought about aspirin for years. aspirin wouldn't really help my headache, i don't think. aspirin is just old school. people have doubts about taking aspirin for pain. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. what's different? it has micro-particles. enters the bloodstream fast and rushes relief to the site of pain.
from new york city this morning, shows the continuing long line of cars waiting to fuel up. gas shortages continue to be found across the east coast, 60% of gas stations in new jersey are closed because they've run out of gas. 70% of stations are closed on long island. the shortage of fuel lead to one violence incident in queens. authorities arrested a motorist yesterday after he pointed a pistol at another motorist who complained when he tried to cut in line while waiting for gas. that man is facing 15 years in prison, if convicted. >>> superstorm sandy could mean trouble for holiday shopping. retail analysts are worried department store sales could fall because people on the east coast had to spend unexpected money on supplies. macy's and bloomingdale's had to shutdown 200 stores. retail chains are expected to benefit, including home depot annual mart. >>> parent company walt disney company announced two million dollar contribution to the victims of superstorm san we are doing everything we can, including the cash donation, plus encouraging our employees to donate on their ow
to get gas and long lines to get into new york city, as police enforced a three-person per vehicle rule. traffic will only get better when all of the tunnels and subway lines are clear of water. and the pumps are operating 24 hours a day to speed up the process. but one look at this tunnel connecting manhattan and brooklyn shows just how much work is still left to be done. the nights are especially hard for people without electricity. >> we've been cold some nights. >> dark and cold. >> reporter: con ed says it will have power back on tomorrow for hundreds of thousands of people in manhattan. that's good news for elaine and mark. they have been stuck in their 20th floor apartment without elevator service since the storm knocked out power. >> coming up is really a hardship for us. >> that's why we stayed up here. >> reporter: here in new jersey, police began allowing people who live along the coast back into their homes for the first time since the storm. for many, it was an emotional homecoming. >> got upset. we lost everything we had. it's nothing we can do. >> reporter: vicente juarez
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